Stores

November 19 2014

Hunter Boots is making waves again. The Edinburgh, Scotland-based historic icon has opened its first-ever flagship store at 83 Regent Street in London with a celebration featuring a troupe of Singing-In-The-Rain dancers arriving in a red double-decker wearing head-to-toe Hunter Original collection.


 
The store design is a funky combo of urban shopping heaven and agricultural themes that echo farm life and barns – all thought up by the design team at Checkland Kindleysides.


 
Established in 1856 and known for its dutiful supply of millions of trench booth for the British troops in both World Wars, Hunter has been making a steady move from boots only to a full-fledged clothing brand.


 
When Hunter hired Alasdhair Willis (aka Mr. Stella McCartney & co-founder of Wallpaper with Tyler Brûlé ) as their design director two years ago, everybody paid attention and started expecting big things. And they have not been disappointed.

The expanded repertoire and the new flagship are just the beginning, however. Willis is going to launch yet another new line in 2015. Hunter Field will be a more technical outdoor collection, for “the guy and girl who wants to look amazing in the wilds of the great outdoors,” as Willis has been quoted describing it.


 
The flagship, with its barnyard ambiance enhanced with a two-storey high LED screen showing fashion shows and campaigns, will not be the only retail expansion either. According to Checkland Kindleysides, it will form the foundation of future retail and shop-in-shop opportunities. - Tuija Seipell.

 

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Design

November 10 2014

Over the past two years, architect Robert Mills (Robert Mills Architects and Interior Designers) and his yoga-enthusiast spouse, Lucinda Mills, have created a sophisticated yoga and Pilates emporium in Melbourne’s South Yarra neighbourhood.



The business, One Hot Yoga, is divided into four studios that occupy space at three addresses. Studio 1 (One Hot Yoga) is at 36 River Street, Studio 2 (One Hot Yoga and Mat Pilates) is at 46 River Street, and right next door at 48 River Street is the newest addition, Studios 3 and 4 (One Hot Pilates).



In total, the studios take up nearly 800 square meters (about 8600 square feet) of space. We love the reception area with its minimalist customized furnishings, glass-covered display case and views of the inner courtyard with its lush greenery.



Simplicity, natural materials, finely controlled lighting and tone-on-tone colour schemes create a gracious and calm environment for all of the spaces. Elegant touches, such as heavy linen curtains and beautiful change rooms enhance the ambiance of understated luxury. Tuija Seipell


 


Art

November 5 2014

Those of you who are regular TCH readers know of CJ Hendry already. She is the extraordinary pen-and-ink artist whose work we fell in love with and then introduced to the public, first through Instagram and then at our Art Hunter temporary art experience in Sydney that we hosted with Jaguar.


 
The success of her work has been absolutely phenomenal, and for a good reason. Nothing compares to the mesmerising result of her painstaking work. Each image appears to be an enlargement of a black-and-white photograph, except that it isn’t. It is a one-of-a-kind, hand-drawn piece of art.


 
Since the first images of her meticulous work were published on Instagram,  CJ Hendry has been exclusively represented by thecoolhunter.


 
She started her series of images of playing cards, one image per crumpled card, and we posted one of the cards on Instagram a week ago. Since then, more than 40 cards have been sold.



We are in the planning stages of introducing the cards – and other CJ Hendry exclusive artworks – at a live space in Sydney or Melbourne next month, but we cannot reveal the details just yet. Keep an eye on The Cool Hunter for final specifics.


 
We are also planning a show of her work in New York for summer 2015.

Each card is 60cm x 60cm framed - To pre order before the show email [email protected]

****UPDATE - All 54 cards have now been sold via our Instagram in 5 days*****


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Stores

November 2 2014

Toronto’s funky, ever-evolving King West Village has just gained another interesting entrepreneurial tenant at the brand-new, 12-storey condo and townhouse project, Fashion House, at 556 King Street West.



The newcomer is Her Majesty’s Pleasure, a flexible concept by husband and wife, Jeff Armstrong and Sara Kardan. The sunny space functions as a hair, nail and beauty salon, a coffee and tea bar (during the day), a cocktail bar (at night), a shop, and even an event space, all tied together by a tightly controlled palette of colors (mainly black, white and wood) and materials.



The designer of Her Majesty’s Pleasure, John Tong of +Tongtong has created, among other notable spaces, also the re-incarnation of the interior of Toronto’s famed Queen Street West hotel, The Drake, dating back to 1890. - Tuija Seipell.


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Food

October 30 2014



Chef-owner Heinz Reitbauer is a member of the Reitbauer family that operates the famous Steirereck restaurant and the Meierei café beneath it in Vienna, and the Pogush Country Inn in Styria, in the southeast of Austria.



His family’s latest contribution to the Austrian culinary excellence is the complete and spectacular renovation of Steirereck that consistently places among the top of the world’s 50 best restaurants list.



In 2005, the Reitbauers moved Steirereck from its home of 35 years in Weißgerbe Lände to Vienna, and took up the former Milchhauspavilion, an Art Nouveau or Jugendstil dairy that overlooks the lush Stadtpark and its Wienfluss promenade. They renovated the building completely prior to opening to the public.



In 2012, the owners announced an open competition to, once again, completely re-imagine the storied restaurant to meet the needs of the ever-demanding, world-travelled, upscale restaurant clientele, and to respond to the demands of a busy kitchen as well.



Viennese architecture firm PPAG architects won the competition with its innovative solution that began the development of the new restaurant environment not from a space that will contain tables, but from an individual table and its connection to its surroundings.



In the new pavilion, formed of long, molecular fingers, each table is flanked by its individual wooden background wall and located against an outer wall. This gives every table the feeling of being private but also connected to the park outside and the rest of the dining area and kitchen inside.



This rearrangement of functions and addition of space did not increase the number of seats – it remained at about 80 - but the main dining hall of the old dairy building with its newly flexible configuration of tables and partitioning now provides additional event space, and all of the inner functions of the restaurant, from food preparation and patisserie to washing, test kitchen and staff areas have been improved and expanded as well.



Wood, glass and reflective metal are the main visual elements of the new Steirereck that now nearly conceals the Milchhauspavilion yet appears to take up very little additional space. - Tuija Seipell.

 

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Random Archive



Offices

October 26 2014

We love the underground feel of this design and research studio created by Zemberek Tasarim  for Vigoss Jeans .



The 250 square-meter (2691 sq.ft.) studio opened this past summer and is part of the 8,000 square meter (86,111 sq.ft) Vigoss/Bulur production and warehousing facilities located in Güneşli Kavşağı, an industrial area about 30 kilometers form the center of Istanbul, Turkey.



Zemberek created a fabulously functional working space for the designers and other team members who needed large flat surfaces to spread out the products, materials and accessories; easy access to the hanging pieces on the racks; and as much freedom to move around as possible. In this type of work, conventional desks, tables, chairs and standard space division will hinder rather than help, which is why the Zemberek team took a different approach.



Gently curving forms dominate the space that is visually homogenous and divided only by different levels horizontally, rather than by partitions, so that the entire area can be used for displaying, viewing and comparing products - mostly jeans and other clothing items.



The limited selection of materials – mainly smoked oak and concrete - makes this studio a great, minimalist background for working with and focusing on the product.



Zemeberk has created several other projects for this client, including showrooms, offices and stores in Istanbul and Moscow. Tuija Seipell


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Art

October 25 2014

New and old Berliners, together with the entire world, will take to the streets on November 9, the global 25th Anniversary celebration of the Fall of the Wall in 1989.



The city, its citizens and friends will participate in the joyous events that commemorate the Peaceful Revolution. Among the key projects are the web portal Fall of the Wall 25 where everyone is welcome to post their memories, opinions and thoughts about the world-changing event.



Another project is a concept called Lichtgrenze by artists Christopher and Marc Bauder. It is a row of 8,000 white luminous balloons creating a 15-kilometre Border of Light, that will mark the former course of the Wall and divide the inner city of Berlin from Bornholmer Strasse to Mauerpark and the Berlin Wall Memorial on Bernauer Strasse to the Reichstag, past the Brandenburg Gate and Checkpoint Charlie to the East Side Gallery. - Tuija Seipell.

 

 

 

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Art

October 21 2014

Our most recent artistic pick is Milan-based, London-educated artist and sculptor, Benedetta Mori Ubaldini.

There is something strangely intriguing and mesmerizing about her chicken-wire sculptures.



Trying to put our finger on it, we came up with more than a few explanations why we love these so much.

One appealing aspect is that they look somehow unfinished and raw. The wire frame is usually the part of a sculpture we do not see. It is not the final product. And yet, these airy and lightweight pieces seem to lack nothing at all. They are very much finished and completed.



And the lightness and weightlessness, that floating feel, is another endearing quality. These pieces seem to be almost nonexistent. Barely there. About to disintegrate and vanish.

And that fleeting property of Ubaldini’s work is yet another reason why we cannot take our eyes off them. Something sneaky, shady, secretive and sly. Maybe even a bit evil and sinister. Maybe we shouldn’t be seeing these ephemeral sculpture innards at all?



Ubaldini’s work has graced store windows, art galleries and event spaces in many countries, and two of her smaller pieces are even on sale at Magis Me Too as decorations for children’s rooms.

In their incredible simplicity, her wire-frame, 3D-pieces leave us much room to interpret and come up with our own viewpoint. Is it good or bad, happy or sad, fun or sinister, serious or just plain playful junk?



For some reason, we want to take this artwork very seriously. We want her to do larger installations. Massive worlds and environments.

After all, if an artist’s work gives us reason to ponder, consider and think, it has given us the best gift art can give us. - Tuija Seipell.


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Kids

October 20 2014

Children deserve much more attention in urban planning than what they are getting currently. As small children and toddlers are not likely to raise their voices to demand the attention, it is up to us adults to do something about it.

We need to support, demand and finance more initiatives that help children – and their parents – enjoy the outdoors, even in urban settings.



French urban planning and architecture firm Espace Libre, has created a delightful multi-functional play area for toddlers in the commune of Alfortville, located 7.6 kilometres (4.7 miles) from the centre of Paris.

Completed this fall, the 2500 square-metre (26910 square foot) play area includes features that encourage exploration, interaction and experimentation through all the senses.

It includes multiple elevations, many kinds of surface textures, many varieties of vegetation and shrubs, and multiple colors. Several kinds of lighting, interactive structures for swinging and bouncing, and interesting surfaces  – such as the strip of “street” meant for chalk art – all add variety to the enjoyment of this space. - Tuija Seipell.

 

 

 

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