Architecture

November 2 2012

We love order and minimalism in buildings. New, freshly planned, pristine and perfect are great attributes for new structures, yet we also find ourselves drawn to things that aren’t so flawless. Recycled, repurposed, previously loved, salvaged. Buildings that have a previous life carry a character that brand-new ones just cannot master.



When old structures are preserved and lovingly restored, we gain in so many ways. Not only do we preserve materials that would otherwise end up in the waste stream, we also respect the heritage of each building, and add to the character of the surrounding area. Sadly, restoring the old is often more costly than building anew, yet we believe that more and more people and companies will continue to do it.



We see combinations of materials that would probably not end up side by side if the opportunity to do something radical didn’t present itself in the often impossibly complex demands of creating livable space from the old and unlivable.



We see solutions to gain more space – add height, increase the number of rooms, expand the footprint -   that would never be used in a new structure. Creative ideas that do not really follow any known rules of style, yet produce a unique, cool style of its own.

Combining existing structures with a linking new segment is also gaining popularity. The resulting combos are often unexpected, fun and practical as well.



Often, there is a need to add light – larger windows and  more openness in general – to older structures that have tiny openings due to the cost of (or unavailability) of window glass, or the cost and labour-intensity of heating.



In some cases, a new superstructure combines a disparate group of existing buildings and makes the entire cluster seem coherent and cosy.

Mimicking or echoing, yet distinctly differing from existing materials, colours, shapes and styles forms is also an elegant way to create a harmonious and elegant new style.



And, then of course, there are the rather mad, but delightfully so, mix-and-match ideas that make a point of not trying to fit in.

Whatever the result, we will be keeping an eye on these New Again structures because we know it is a trend that will keep growing. - Tuija Seipell

If you have seen cool examples of this, please let us know.

Image 1 - Refurbishment of west tower in Huesca City, Spain
Image 2 - Shoreham Street, Sheffield, UK
Image 3 - Brighton College, UK
Image 4 - Health Centre for Elderly People
Image 5 - Casa He - Italy
Image 6 & 7 - Convent of Sant Francesc in Santpedor, Spain.
Image 8 & 9 - Wolzak Farmhouse



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