Stores

Stores

November 18 2013

Rotate: Curated by The Cool Hunter – A completely new surprising shopping experience every 8 weeks. Always new, always different, always changing.

At  TCH, we are always into something new. Just cannot help ourselves. A year ago, we launched the temporary two-week The Cool House in Melbourne & Sydney. More than 10,000 people attended and it was a huge success.


 
But rather than repeat ourselves this year, we wanted to evolve this cool concept. The result: Rotate by The Cool Hunter – a store that will stay in place for a year but the theme will change every eight weeks. New theme, new store, new everything every two months. Blink, and the shop has changed completely! Blink, and you’ve missed it! If you want it, you need to buy it now. It won’t be there next time.
 
Good bye to the same old boring sets of stores. Every mall, every airport, ever shopping street – the same stores, the same brands, same standard look-alike themes. Welcome Rotate by The Cool Hunter – the shop full of surprises, the concept that does not stand still.

The Rotate Concept:

These themed temporary pop-up stores will constantly evolve - and not just a changing window display or a few new products. The entire setup and product mix will change every 8 weeks.
 
There will be a new theme for each period e.g. Summer Lovers, The Art Hunter, Colour Your World, Winter Wonderland. But this won't be your regular, boring store either – Rotate will be fun, innovative, interactive and visually spectacular.
 
Products and brands will be carefully curated by The Cool Hunter Team and feature amazing local brands and unique international offerings.

Our first theme "Summer Lovers" launches in Sydney in 2 weeks - stay tuned for more info later this month.

Share It:  
Stores

November 14 2013

We like this Run Colors sneaker store in Poznań (Poland), because it breaks some very tired and boring patterns that have become the norm in sneaker retail.
 
We’ve seen more than enough of massive images of sports heroes among cavernous, multi-storey stores that feel more like warehouses than shops created for humans to enjoy.


 
The stuffy “gentlemen’s club” milieu has also been done to death, and no matter how hip or edgy the art on the walls or the celebrity behind the clichéd ideas, stuffy is still only stuffy.

In addition, sports stores and sports brands have become so incredibly logo-happy that it seems impossible to find great, functional sporty footwear, clothing or accessories without appearing like an ad for a brand. Tone it down already, we say.


 
But this minimalist shop – the second one of the Warsaw-based Run Colors - looks refreshingly different in its bare-bones simplicity.
 
The slate-grey surfaces work beautifully as a background for the colourful footwear selection that in this store consists mainly of limited series of Nike, Adidas and New Balance sneakers.


 
Poznań-based mode:lina architekci team of founders, Paweł Garus and Jerzy Woźniak, and designers, Kinga Kin and Agnieszka Owsiany, took the Run Colors name literally and had some understated fun with it.
 
They imagined colors running and thought of shoelaces, and from there they devised the simple colorful ropes theme that runs throughout the 110 square meter (1184 square foot) store.


 
We love the antique furnishings, and the complete lack of signs, logos, tags or images. It also does not hurt that this store is in Poznań’s famed Stary Browar complex that is a former Hugger Brewery and dates back to 1844. - Tuija Seipell

Share It:  
Stores

September 19 2013

The work of Paris-based Matali Crasset always makes us smile. Her ability to take something basic and make it appear fun and fresh is unparalleled. More remarkable is her ability to do this while avoiding the gummy-coloured slide that so easily leads to overly cute, fake and just plain childish.


 
Including just enough colour to pop, adding just enough quirky shapes to make a point, and leaving everything else out, makes this little university grocery shop a delight.


 
Mini M grocery is a neighborhood grocery store at the Toulouse University where the student services organization is working to improving the options and accessibility of various food service alternatives from eat-in and take-out to grocery stores.



This colourful market is designed to stand out from the concrete buildings that surround it. Its overall feel is positive and fun; it is a market-stall-like casual shop, clearly different from the typical, boring convenience stores and corner stores elsewhere in the city.


 
Crasset worked on this project with graphic designers from Praline and branding specialists of Terres Nuages. - Tuija Seipell

Share It:  
Stores

September 9 2013

As the ice cream and cupcake shop genre has become increasingly pink and cute, to the point of icky and utterly boring, we were delighted to run across Once Upon A Cream.



It is an ice cream shop in the beach resort town of Hua Hin, about 200 km south of Bangkok, Thailand. The refreshing shop was designed by Bangkok’s MADA Design Factory.



The design team was led by co-founder and creative director Nisachol Loetritsirikul. She managed to avoid the cute overload and instead came up with a crisp balance of whimsy and old-word dairy.



A few little nods to Willy Wonka are there – the pieces of machinery and copper fixtures, the pepperminty red-and-white round tables, the chewing-gum blue seating, the blue sky and fluffy clouds in the ceiling. But they are counterbalanced by the old-dairy accents: The white tiles, the clean surfaces, the wooden boxes.



The wood boards, rattan chairs and again the blue sky - references to the resort town location – round out the design concept. - Tuija Seipell.

Share It:  
Stores

July 16 2013

In the 1950s Roger Delbôve started a chain of high-end hair salons in Belgium, eventually growing and expanding it with his wife, Marion who had worked with Helena Rubinstein Belgium. Some 20 years later, they were researching, developing and producing their own products and offering a complete service for women, from head to toe.

In 2011, Gina and Sybille d'Ansembourg join the Delbôves’ daugter, Isabelle, in the business and focus on expanding the reach of the Delbôve Cosmetics name.



This has now culminated in the opening of the Delbôve Cosmetics flagship store in Brussels this May. Brussels-based freelance designer, Christophe Remy, was in charge of branding from web, package and stationery design to art direction and interior design of the boutique itself.



The clean and elegant store is a cool marriage of a modern spa and beauty salon with a pharmacy of a bygone era. - Tuija Seipell.

Share It:  

Stores

May 2 2013

Opening Ceremony has relocated its flagship store from Shibuya to Omotesando to the home of street fashion on Cat’s Alley. The new Tokyo flagship store sees OC founders Humberto Leon and Carol Lim realise yet another temple to their love of out-of-the-box fashion.

Alongside neighbours such as Ragtag, Burton and Paul Smith Jeans, the new store is 1200 square-metres (12,917 sq.ft.) over four themed floors (rather than Shibuya’s much larger eight-floor store).

The interior reflects the younger, edgier fashion crowd that swarms Harajuku’s streets each weekend and the stock has a strong Tokyo flavour with special collections by Yoko Ono, Dallas-born, Tokyo-based Kiko Mizuhara and OC favorite Chloe Sevigny. A pastel palette of lilacs, pinks and baby blues is offset by neon, wild cabinetry, Ben-Day dots and Pop Art inspired staircases.

Each floor showcases Opening Ceremony’s unmistakable fashion edit; high-fashion plus cult brands including Alexander Wang, Carven, Christopher Kane, Phillip Lim and Proenza Shouler mixed in with the Opening Ceremony clothing lines, fresh, up-and-comers and their perfume collaboration with Le Labo.

The zoological-themed floor features ostriches, llamas and striking wooden horse jewelry cabinets showing off limited edition pieces.

The store is unmistakably Tokyo-style and there is a reason why retailers are looking to Tokyo and the OC founders for inspiration. Leon and Lim’s have their fingers on the pulse of global fashion, they collaborate with the likes of Martin Margiela, Adidas and Rodarte whilst revitalising the Kenzo fashion house. And still manage to kit Beyonce out in custom Kenzo. - Emily Ross

Share It:  
Stores

January 25 2013

Viennese mums and dads have yet another option to spoil their offspring: Bambini in central Vienna at Tuchlauben 7.

The interior of the 360 square-meter (3875 sq.ft) multi-level emporium of children’s high-end fashion was entirely custom-designed by the 12-year-old Viennese firm, Architektur Denis Kosutic, for the Vienna-based MB Fashion GmbH.



Carrying such brands as Armani Junior, Fendi, Gucci, La Perla, Roberto Cavalli, Versace Young and Missoni, this is MB Fashion’s first shop of the Bambini concept.

Kosutic and collaborators Mareike Kuchenbecker and Carina Haberl took a Wizard-of-Oz/Alice-in-Wonderland/Jules Verne approach yet cooled the usual colour riot of kiddie stores down into a junior film noir environment



Everything from wall and floor treatments to furnishings and display elements was created specifically for this store.

With smoky grey as the main hue, the space is both imaginatively fun and slightly scary – and we all know that most kids love to be scared, if they feel safe.



There are surprises and details that don’t quite match, which makes the space interesting and fun, yet keeps the tone down at a tolerable level.



The custom-created surreal flowers-and-lollipops pattern appears in various places and at different scales throughout the store. Cage-like pillars made of copper tubing create the central merchandise displays and evoke a feeling of retro-futuristic submarine vehicles.



Velvet draping, soft floorcoverings and smooth surfaces on some furnishings add a softness to temper the hard and shiny metallic components.



Also custom-designed are the friezes of mushrooms, lollipops and pears, and seating shaped like bananas, strawberries, lemons and plums.

The designers aimed for a space that would “allow adults to be kids and kids to be adults.” We think they have succeeded. - Tuija Seipell.



Photographer: Lea Titz

Share It:  
Stores

December 20 2012

This funky pharmacy with its unconventional exterior and startling interior volume is not something you’d expect to stroll into in a small, ancient town in north-central Portugal.


 
Yet the 50,000 or so inhabitants of Vila Real (=Royal Town) who can trace their town’s history back to the paleolithic era, were quite used to an imposing pharmacy building on this site.


 
But when the private owner of Farmácia Lordelo - which had already operated nearly quarter-century on this site - decided to rebuild, she did not go for timid.
 
Instead, the architecture and interior design by JOSÉ CARLOS CRUZ – ARQUITECTO went all the way to a super-modern, taking advantage of the fact that the area does not have strict building style restrictions. The building certainly stands out in this residential neighborhood located slightly off the city centre.


 
Many of us are used to the type of “drug store” where the actual pharmacy part is squeezed into a back corner somewhere and given as little space as possible – as it is not the part generating the profit - while the rest of the store space is taken up by everything from diapers and toilet paper to books and food, and with the tacky packaging and POS material that goes with that. A pharmacy this clean and beautiful is a rarity, indeed.


 
Farmácia Lordelo is not only a compounding pharmacy but also a laboratory, which is one of the reasons the designers toned everything down and kept the interior airy, white and logo-less. How wonderfully refreshing! And yes, it does look a bit sterile and clinical as well, but that was the  intention.


 
The oval-shaped space is 522 square meters in size (5618 sq.ft.) and the various functions are divided into two levels with the retail floor on ground level..
 
We also love the cool aluminum coated and perforated exterior where the only opening is the main entrance to the retail floor. The enormous cross logo and the external lighting changes creating an animated and lively contrast to the monochrome interior. - Tuija Seipell


 
Images by Fernando Guerra, FG+SG Fotografia de Architectura

Share It:  
Stores

December 7 2012

 
Yes, yes! We LOVE the cool, clean, minimalist interior (no news here to our readers) of the brand-new 100 square-meter retail store, the HITGallery, opened at the end of September in the Times Square shopping center in Hong Kong.


 
The elegantly retro store, designed by the talented Milan-based architect and designer, Fabio Novembre, is the first iteration of a new global multi-brand retail concept of the Pettoranello-based fashion house, Ittierre S.p.A. Ittierre holds the licenses, manufacturers and markets several brands, including Aquascutum, C’n’C Costume National, Galliano, GF Ferré, Fiorucci, Karl Lagerfeld Paris, Pierre Balmain and Tommy Hilfiger Collection. The latest brand to sign with Ittierre is Jean Paul Gaultier, with his men’s collection launching in Fall/Winter 2013-14.


 
The HITGallery boutiques, slated to open around the globe, feature\s several, if not all, of the lines Ittiere represents. The next store in line will be the Milan flagship but in the meanwhile, Ittierre has just opened a 1,000-square-meter temporary store, IT'S 30 MANZONI, at Palazzo Scotti Gallarati in Milan's luxury neighborhood.


 
In a media release, Fabio Novembre is quoted as saying that The HITGallery stores capture the essence and spirit of Italy by, for example, taking inspiration from the surreal atmospheres of the artist Giorgio De Chirico.


 
He continues: “Upon entering the concept store in Hong Kong, people will promptly notice the strong Italian imprint of the architectural design’s classical matrix: symmetrical structure, row of arches, one dominant hue offset by two-tone flooring. The color defining the walls – a neutral shade bordering between green and sky or cerulean blue – defies classification, so becoming the ideal backdrop for all the brands sold in the store.”


 
We love the uncluttered feel, the delicious Casamania Her chair (also by Novembre) and the complete lack of brand-clutter, especially signs and logos. The latter, of course, will pose the most massive of all retail challenges that trumps all design and merchandising feats: The need to provide relevant and sincerely customer-centric service. Don’t even get us started on THAT topic! - Tuija Seipell

Photography by Dennis Lo

 

Stores

December 6 2012

The ultimate lifestyle shopping experience has arrived to Australia’s most iconic beach: The Cool House by The Cool Hunter. After the huge success of The Cool House in Melbourne last week (4,500 people attended over four days), Sydney's Bondi Beach welcomes the ultimate pop-up boutique.

For 10 days only, The Cool Hunter lifestyle is available in the real world - detailed throughout The Lighthouse, Pacific Bondi Beach's f finest penthouse.

As you'd expect from The Cool Hunter, it is all wall-to-wall style, progressive design and understated luxury – and it is all available for purchase; every single items is for sale, as is The Lighthouse itself

Styled by Steve Cordony from Belle Magazine.

There are three kitchen displays with the latest designer kitchen accessories to purchase.

Everything is available to buy, including The Lighthouse.

Flowers by Poho Florist in Potts Point.

Balcony Design by Garden Life

Balcony Design by Garden Life

Large mobile artwork chandelier by Sydney-based paper artist Benja Harvey

Images by Felix Forest represented by DLM

The Cool House Sydney
Friday 7 Dec - Sunday 16 Dec
10:00am to 6:00pm
Pacific Bondi Beach
6th Floor of the Swiss Grand Hotel
(Enter through Swiss Grand Hotel foyer - take lift to level 5 and follow signs once you see surfboard with Pacific signage)
180 Campbell Parade
Bondi Beach

Share It:  

Random Archive

Ads
Art